Event Title

Panel Discussion: The Future of Corporate Reform through Shareholder Activism

Location

Millhiser Moot Court Room

Start Date

15-2-2019 1:45 PM

End Date

15-2-2019 2:45 PM

Description

Carliss Chatman, moderator for this panel, is an Assistant Professor of Law at Washington and Lee University School of Law. Professor Chatman teaches an array of business law, commercial law, and ethics classes. Her scholarship interests are in the fields of corporate law, ethics, and civil procedure. Professor Chatman’s work is also influenced by over two decades of service on non-profit boards and involvement with community organizations. Prior to law teaching, Professor Chatman was a commercial litigation attorney in Houston, Texas. In practice, she focused on trial law, appeals and arbitration in pharmaceutical, healthcare, mass torts, product liability, as well as oil, gas and mineral law. Professor Chatman is a 2004 graduate of the University of Texas School of Law. She received her bachelor’s degree in 2001 from Duke University with honors in English.

Ifeoma Ajunwa is an Assistant Professor in the Law, Labor Relations, and History Department of Cornell University’s Industrial and Labor Relations School (ILR) and Associated Faculty Member at Cornell Law School. She is also a Faculty Associate at the Berkman Klein Center at Harvard Law School. Dr. Ajunwa’s research interests are at the intersection of law and technology with a particular focus on the ethical governance of workplace technologies. Her research focus is also on diversity and inclusion in the labor market and the workplace. Dr. Ajunwa earned a Ph.D. in Sociology at Columbia University in the City of New York (emphasis on Organizational Theory and Law and Society). Prior to graduate school, she also earned a law degree from the University of San Francisco School of Law and Dr. Ajunwa has been admitted to the Bar in the states of New York and California. Dr. Ajunwa’s articles have been published or are forthcoming in both top law review and peer review publications including the Fordham Law Review, the California Law Review, the Northwestern Law Review, the Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review, The Berkeley Journal of Employment and Labor Law, the Harvard Business Review, Journal of Law, Medicine, and Ethics, and in Research in the Sociology of Work, among others. Dr. Ajunwa’s forthcoming book, “The Qualified Worker,” which examines the role of technology in the workplace as moderated by employment and anti-discrimination laws, will be published by Cambridge University Press in 2019.

D. Wendy Greene is a Visiting Professor of Law at Washington and Lee University School of Law. Professor Greene is visiting W&L from Samford University Cumberland School of Law. The daughter of American civil rights activists, Professor Greene is a leading U.S. anti-discrimination law scholar, teacher and advocate. Professor Greene is a graduate of Xavier University of Louisiana (cum laude, B.A. with honors in English and a double minor in African American studies and Spanish); Tulane University Law School (J.D.); and The George Washington University Law School (LL.M.) where she specialized in comparative slavery and race relations law in the Americas and Caribbean and employment discrimination law. Prior to law teaching, Professor Greene, a South Carolina native, was employed with a Washington, D.C. lobbying firm and a Houston, Texas boutique labor and employment law firm. Cited globally, Professor Greene’s award-winning legal scholarship interrogates the ways socio-legal constructions of identity inform and constrain civil rights protections against inequality. One of the foremost experts on grooming codes discrimination, Professor Greene is currently developing her first book, #FreeTheHair: Locking Black Hair to Civil Rights Movements (under contract with the University of California-Berkeley Press), which will be the first to examine what she calls the “hyper-regulation of Black women’s and girls’ bodies via their hair” in public and private spaces alongside natural hair movements through a global lens.

David H. Webber is a Professor of Law at Boston University School of Law and the author of “The Rise of the Working-Class Shareholder: Labor’s Last Best Weapon”, published by Harvard University Press in April 2018. Professor Webber co-edited a second book, Research Handbook on Representative Shareholder Litigation (Elgar), forthcoming this year. He has published scholarly articles including “The Use and Abuse of Labor’s Capital” in the New York University Law Review and “The Plight of the Individual Investor in Securities Class Actions” in the Northwestern University Law Review, with additional work forthcoming in the Vanderbilt Law Review and elsewhere. Professor Webber is the winner of Boston University School of Law’s 2017 Michael Melton Award for Teaching Excellence. He also co-teaches the Pensions and Capital Stewardship course for the Harvard Trade Union program at Harvard Law School. He is a graduate of Columbia and NYU Law School, where he was an editor for the law review.

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Feb 15th, 1:45 PM Feb 15th, 2:45 PM

Panel Discussion: The Future of Corporate Reform through Shareholder Activism

Millhiser Moot Court Room

Carliss Chatman, moderator for this panel, is an Assistant Professor of Law at Washington and Lee University School of Law. Professor Chatman teaches an array of business law, commercial law, and ethics classes. Her scholarship interests are in the fields of corporate law, ethics, and civil procedure. Professor Chatman’s work is also influenced by over two decades of service on non-profit boards and involvement with community organizations. Prior to law teaching, Professor Chatman was a commercial litigation attorney in Houston, Texas. In practice, she focused on trial law, appeals and arbitration in pharmaceutical, healthcare, mass torts, product liability, as well as oil, gas and mineral law. Professor Chatman is a 2004 graduate of the University of Texas School of Law. She received her bachelor’s degree in 2001 from Duke University with honors in English.

Ifeoma Ajunwa is an Assistant Professor in the Law, Labor Relations, and History Department of Cornell University’s Industrial and Labor Relations School (ILR) and Associated Faculty Member at Cornell Law School. She is also a Faculty Associate at the Berkman Klein Center at Harvard Law School. Dr. Ajunwa’s research interests are at the intersection of law and technology with a particular focus on the ethical governance of workplace technologies. Her research focus is also on diversity and inclusion in the labor market and the workplace. Dr. Ajunwa earned a Ph.D. in Sociology at Columbia University in the City of New York (emphasis on Organizational Theory and Law and Society). Prior to graduate school, she also earned a law degree from the University of San Francisco School of Law and Dr. Ajunwa has been admitted to the Bar in the states of New York and California. Dr. Ajunwa’s articles have been published or are forthcoming in both top law review and peer review publications including the Fordham Law Review, the California Law Review, the Northwestern Law Review, the Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review, The Berkeley Journal of Employment and Labor Law, the Harvard Business Review, Journal of Law, Medicine, and Ethics, and in Research in the Sociology of Work, among others. Dr. Ajunwa’s forthcoming book, “The Qualified Worker,” which examines the role of technology in the workplace as moderated by employment and anti-discrimination laws, will be published by Cambridge University Press in 2019.

D. Wendy Greene is a Visiting Professor of Law at Washington and Lee University School of Law. Professor Greene is visiting W&L from Samford University Cumberland School of Law. The daughter of American civil rights activists, Professor Greene is a leading U.S. anti-discrimination law scholar, teacher and advocate. Professor Greene is a graduate of Xavier University of Louisiana (cum laude, B.A. with honors in English and a double minor in African American studies and Spanish); Tulane University Law School (J.D.); and The George Washington University Law School (LL.M.) where she specialized in comparative slavery and race relations law in the Americas and Caribbean and employment discrimination law. Prior to law teaching, Professor Greene, a South Carolina native, was employed with a Washington, D.C. lobbying firm and a Houston, Texas boutique labor and employment law firm. Cited globally, Professor Greene’s award-winning legal scholarship interrogates the ways socio-legal constructions of identity inform and constrain civil rights protections against inequality. One of the foremost experts on grooming codes discrimination, Professor Greene is currently developing her first book, #FreeTheHair: Locking Black Hair to Civil Rights Movements (under contract with the University of California-Berkeley Press), which will be the first to examine what she calls the “hyper-regulation of Black women’s and girls’ bodies via their hair” in public and private spaces alongside natural hair movements through a global lens.

David H. Webber is a Professor of Law at Boston University School of Law and the author of “The Rise of the Working-Class Shareholder: Labor’s Last Best Weapon”, published by Harvard University Press in April 2018. Professor Webber co-edited a second book, Research Handbook on Representative Shareholder Litigation (Elgar), forthcoming this year. He has published scholarly articles including “The Use and Abuse of Labor’s Capital” in the New York University Law Review and “The Plight of the Individual Investor in Securities Class Actions” in the Northwestern University Law Review, with additional work forthcoming in the Vanderbilt Law Review and elsewhere. Professor Webber is the winner of Boston University School of Law’s 2017 Michael Melton Award for Teaching Excellence. He also co-teaches the Pensions and Capital Stewardship course for the Harvard Trade Union program at Harvard Law School. He is a graduate of Columbia and NYU Law School, where he was an editor for the law review.